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It’s a big day for us on the Managed Languages team! As announced at the //BUILD conference earlier today, and as posted by Soma on his blog, we are not just delivering a new preview of Roslyn to all of you, but are in fact moving all of the compiler code to open source! The code will be released and maintained by MS Open Tech, who are our partners in this endeavor. The goal of open-sourcing the compilers is something that we’ve been working towards for just over a year, and we’re really...

Source Feed: C# Frequently Asked Questions
Categories: roslyn, ms open tech, open source

(For the next few posts, I’m going to introduce readers to the different feature teams in the Managed Languages org.  Today, I’m starting this with a focus on the performance team.) Back in 2000, I found myself assigned to be the performance lead of the Visual Basic team, and my first assigned goal was to drive the performance marks of the (then) forthcoming Visual Basic .NET to be in line with the numbers for Visual Basic 6.0.  The primary focus was on the VB runtime APIs at first.  That was...

Source Feed: C# Frequently Asked Questions
Categories: roslyn, performance

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, we ended up with a little too much time between previews, to our subsequent embarrassment. In fact, it came to our attention recently that the licensing for the most “recent” CTP (and admittedly I use the term “recent” loosely, given that it was released in September 2012) is set to expire on January 1st, 2014.    We don’t really want to reopen a 15-month-old deliverable to update the license, particularly when the code involved is completely...

Source Feed: C# Frequently Asked Questions
Categories: roslyn

So, the entryway to my house has eight light switches along the wall.  Two of them control the porch lights, and another two work the same entryway light (despite the switches being only a couple of feet apart).  I haven’t the foggiest idea what the rest of the switches do.  I’ve been scared to try them out, actually.  (I worry that one day I’ll accidentally throw one of them and find out later that my couch is missing or something odd like that.) However, I am pleased to announce that we’ve...

Source Feed: C# Frequently Asked Questions
Categories: roslyn


Once you write an OWIN Middleware service, it can be reused everywhere as long as OWIN is supported. In my last post, I discussed how you could write an Authentication Handler in Katana for Hawk (HMAC Authentication). Good news is NancyFx can be run as an OWIN handler, so you can use many of existing middleware services, including the ones that are ship with Katana. Running NancyFx as a OWIN handler is pretty straightforward, and discussed in detail as part of the NancyFx documentation here....

Source Feed: DotNetSlackers Latest ASP.NET News in Category C#

As I discussed in my previous post, Katana is pretty much organized in middleware services.  One of those middleware services is authentication, which provides some built-in implementations for existing OAuth providers such as Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft, and also an implementation for Forms authentication with cookies.  All those implementations are currently distributed as Nuget packages under the name of Microsoft.Owin.Security.*, where the last part identifies the name of...Did...

Source Feed: DotNetSlackers Latest ASP.NET News in Category C#

Introduction The .NET ecosystem offers today a lot of alternatives for developing web applications. You can either use any of the frameworks supported by Microsoft with ASP.NET such as Forms, MVC or Web API, or any other open source alternative like FubuMVC, ServiceStack, NancyFx or OpenRasta to name a few. From an architecture standpoint, all these frameworks have three main layers in common (in spite of the difference with the implementation details), hosting, middleware, and application. ...

Source Feed: DotNetSlackers Latest ASP.NET News in Category C#

As you can see in the VS2013 Preview, we have not added new language features to C# and Visual Basic in the next version of Visual Studio. I’d like to share our thinking on this. There are essentially two main reasons why we chose not to evolve the languages this time around. The most important is that we just shipped new versions of these two languages less than a year ago, with support for asynchrony being a major new and impactful language feature in both. Developers are still learning how...

Source Feed: C# Frequently Asked Questions
Categories: c#, visual basic, language features, vb

In LINQ, the 'fluent' method syntax flows logically and intuitively, and allows them to be combined simply, because each method returns the appropriate type of object for the next. Can this fluent technique be extended as an API style to make it easier to develop C# team-based applications for enterprises?...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look:...

Source Feed: DotNetSlackers Latest ASP.NET News in Category C#

Tomorrow, the 30th of November, 2012, is the first day of my fifth decade here on Earth, and my last day at Microsoft. (*) I've been working at Microsoft full-time since 1996 and had two years of internships before that. Microsoft is an awesome company. We do great work here: work that changes the way people interact with information in a fundamental way. And I in particular, have had the pleasure and the privilege to work on technologies that change how developers like me get their jobs done....

Source Feed: Fabulous Adventures In Coding
Categories: introduction, metablogging

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In C# it is illegal to declare a class D whose base class B is in any way less accessible than D. I'm occasionally asked why that is. There are a number of reasons; today I'll start with a very specific scenario and then talk about a general philosophy. Suppose you and your coworker Alice are developing the code for assembly Foo, which you intend to be fully trusted by its users. Alice writes: public class B{  public void Dangerous() {...}} And you write public class D : B{... other stuff...

Source Feed: Fabulous Adventures In Coding
Categories: c#, brittle base classes, language design

I am pleased to announce that Essential C# 5.0 by Mark Michaelis, and, new for this edition, yours truly, is available for pre-order now. It will be in stores in early December. As long-time readers of this blog know, I was one of the technical editors for Essential C# 4.0 and Essential C# 3.0. Mark was kind enough to ask me if I would like to take a larger role in the process of updating the text for the new edition, which I gladly agreed to. There is no easier way to get a byline in a book...

Source Feed: Fabulous Adventures In Coding
Categories: c#, books, c# 5.0

Last time I discussed how "dynamic" tends to spread through a program like a virus: if an expression of dynamic type "touches" another expression then that other expression often also becomes of dynamic type. Today I want to describe one of the least well understood aspects of method type inference, which also uses a contagion model when "dynamic" gets involved. Long-time readers know that method type inference is one of my favourite parts of the C# language; for new readers who might not be...

Source Feed: Fabulous Adventures In Coding
Categories: c#, lambda expressions, type inference, c# 4.0, language design

Suppose you're an epidemiologist modeling the potential spread of a highly infectious disease. The straightforward way to model such a series of unfortunate events is to assume that the population can be divided into three sets: the definitely infected, the definitely healthy, and the possibly infected. If a member of the healthy population encounters a member of the definitely infected or possibly infected population, then they become a member of the possibly infected population. (Or, put...

Source Feed: Fabulous Adventures In Coding
Categories: security, c#, c# 4.0

Working with strings is a very common task for most C# developers. The .NET Framework offers good variety of tools for working with strings, but care must be taken as there are several gotchas to trip up the beginner. The first thing to note about strings in .NET is that they are Reference Types. Reference […]The post C# Strings – Getting Started with Strings appeared first on C# Help.

Source Feed: C# Help
Categories: c# language, stringbuilder, strings

There are three primary methods of passing parameters to C# methods: Regular Parameter Passing This is passing parameters with no modifying keywords : void MyMethod(Student studentObj, int aNumber) { aNumber += 5; studentObj.Name = "Jon"; } In the above example MyMethod takes two parameters – a Student object and an Integer. Note the difference between […]The post Passing Parameters in C# appeared first on C# Help.

Source Feed: C# Help
Categories: c# language, out, parameters, ref, reference types, value types

Very often the inbuilt numerical formatting in C# will be insufficent and you will want to apply the custom formatting for your numbers. The String.Format method is very flexible and can be used to apply custom formatting rules. The # character informs the Format method how to format the numerical value, for example to forma […]The post C# Custom Number Formatting appeared first on C# Help.

Source Feed: C# Help
Categories: c# language, formatting, string, string.format

C# ships with several inbuilt formatting specifies which can be used to quickly format a number, for example the ‘c’ specifier will format the number as a currency: double dbl1 = 9999999.9999999; outputStr = string.Format("This is the currency format {0:c}", dbl1); This will output the numerical value as a currency based on the user’s current […]The post Formatting Numerical Data in C# appeared first on C# Help.

Source Feed: C# Help
Categories: c# language, format, numbers, string.format

Working with strings is a common task in most apps but there are several ‘gotchas’ that can arise due to the immutable nature of a  String in .NET. Immutable simply means that once created it doesn’t change. This seems strange at first since the value of a string variable can indeed be altered : string […]The post Strings are Immutable! appeared first on C# Help.

Source Feed: C# Help
Categories: c# language, garbage collection, garbage collector, string

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